Ten Things Every Juvenile Court Judge Should Know about Trauma and Delinquency 
To be most effective in achieving its mission, the juvenile court must both understand the role of traumatic exposure in the lives of children and engage resources and interventions that address child traumatic stress. Accordingly, the purpose of this technical assistant bulletin is to highlight the ten crucial areas that judges need to be familiar with in order to best assist traumatized youth who enter the juvenile justice system.

Federal Resources on Missing and Exploited Children: A Directory for Law Enforcement and other Public and Private Agencies
First published in 1996, the Federal Resources on Missing and Exploited Children’s Directory has become an effective resource that can be used by agencies and organizations involved in the safe recovery of missing children. The Directory is a compilation of the many services, programs, publications, and training that address issues of child sexual exploitation, child pornography, child abduction, and missing children cases.

Access to Counsel-OJJDP Juvenile Justice Bulletin June 2004 
This Bulletin describes issues surrounding legal counsel in the juvenile justice system, explores factors that hinder access to and quality of counsel, discusses the elements of quality counsel, and offers examples of how some states and local organizations are meeting the challenge of improving access to legal counsel for juveniles. The Bulletin also includes a list of resources and tools for practitioners.

Common Juvenile Justice Acronyms

Common Juvenile Justice Terms

Juvenile Delinquency Guidelines-Improving Court Practice in Juvenile Delinquency Cases
This document outlines best practices and can be used to help courts identify problem areas, plan for change, and implement improvement. Published by the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, RenoNevada.

Reconnecting: The Role of the Juvenile Court in Reentry.
A blueprint for the nation’s courts constitutes the first written guideline for extending the Juvenile Court’s role in managing the reentry of youthful offenders.

Making a difference requires both the juvenile justice system, and community and parent involvement.


All teens deserve our help. This is not just a problem for their families; it’s a problem AND opportunity for us all.


For more information, visit our Organizations page or check out our Resources, as well as resources specific to Parents and Youth.